Uganda COVID-19 Campaign Materials

The Uganda Kijja Kugwa  (English translation: “COVID-19 Will Pass”) campaign promotes awareness of and adherence to the national standard operating procedures (SOPs) related to risk communication and prevention of COVID-19, including vaccine uptake, addressing vaccine hesitancy, and proper management of COVID-19 cases. 

The campaign tools include radio spots, print (posters, fact booklets, home care guide, wall charts, z-cards, stickers, banners), TV spots, videos, social media, digital media tools for providers, clients, and gatekeepers/influencers. Since implementation, the campaign has been refreshed to incorporate messaging on vaccines, including a special Moments campaign. Various materials are available in English, Ateso, Acholi, Karamojong, Luganda, Lumasaba, Lusoga, Runyankore, Runyoro-Rutooro, Swahili, and other local languages.

The campaign was developed In partnership with the Ministry of Health, UNICEF, WHO, USAID, and the USAID Social and Behavior Change Activity. For more information, contact Glory Mkandawire, Chief of Party gmkanda2@jhu.edu.

Resources:

Moments campaign for vaccine uptake, featuring sentimental posters and videos of gatherings with friends, family, and colleagues, that reinforce vaccination.

    Response to COVID-19, a practical guide for schools

    The development of this practical guide is part of the response to Covid-19 in schools and schools.

    This work was coordinated by DCMS / MEN, in partnership with SNEIPS / MSAS, Atelier FONS and USAID / Breakthrough Action.

    This guide, which is intended to be a tool to support the educational community in establishing good attitudes and practices, is made up of three parts:

    • Documentary section in which generalities on Covid-19 are discussed;
    • Practical part where technical sheets are presented accompanied by illustrations of the measures decreed by the health authorities;
    • General recommendations section.

      Source: Response to COVID-19, a practical guide for schools

    Four Things You Can Do to Support Your Teen’s Mental Health

    This is guidance for parents to help them deal with their teenagers’ mental health, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The four things parents can do are:

    1. Encourage them to share their feelings
    2. Take the time to support them
    3. Work through conflict together
    4. Care for yourself

    Source: Four Things You Can Do to Support Your Teen’s Mental Health

      Questions and Answers: Adolescents, Youth and COVID-19

      These questions and answers were developed by the World Health Organization, UNESCO, UNFPA and UNICEF.

      Questions include:

      • Can adolescents catch COVID-19?
      • Can adolescents spread COVID-19 to other people even if they have mild or no symptoms?
      • Since there are few known cases of adolescents getting seriously ill with COVID-19, should I go to a health facility if I develop symptoms of the disease?
      • I am on medication for a chronic health condition. Should I change anything?
      • I am bored staying home. Since I am very unlikely to get severely ill even if I was to get COVID-19, why is it important that I follow the guidelines to prevent transmission such as keeping physical distance from other people?
      • I am feeling really anxious about COVID-19 and its impact on my life. What should I do?

      Source: Questions and Answers: Adolescents, Youth and COVID-19

        Classroom Precautions During COVID-19

        This article aims to support teachers with information and tips on various topics.

        These include:

        Source: Classroom Precautions During COVID-19

          Advice on the Use of Masks for Children in the Community in the Context of COVID-19

          This document provides guidance to decision makers, public and child health professionals to inform policy on the use of masks for children in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It does not address the use of masks for adults working with children or parents/guardians or the use of masks for children in health-care settings. This interim guidance will be revised and updated as new evidence emerges.

          This guidance provides specific considerations for the use of non-medical masks, also known as fabric masks, by children as a means for source control in the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic. The document is an annex to the WHO’s Advice on the use of masks in the context of COVID-191 in which further details on fabric masks can be found. This annex also advises the use of medical masks for children under certain conditions. For the purposes of this guidance, children are defined as anyone below the age of 18 years.

          Source: Advice on the Use of Masks for Children in the Community in the Context of COVID-19

            Supporting your Child’s Mental Health as They Return to School during COVID-19

            The coronavirus outbreak has caused major disruptions to daily life and children are feeling these changes deeply. While the return to school will be not only welcome but exciting for many students, others will be feeling anxious or frightened. This article offers tips to help children navigate some of the complicated emotions they may be facing with going back to school.

            Source: Supporting your Child’s Mental Health as They Return to School during COVID-19

              Updated Resources and Tools for Reopening Schools and Childcare Programs

              The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has updated their guidelines for reopening of schools and childcare centers as of July 23, 2020.

              The resources and tools made available on that date support how to open schools safely by promoting behaviors that prevent spread, altering how a school and school day is structured, and outlining how to keep the school environment healthy through cleaning, proper ventilation, and other practices. The resources and tools also describe what to do to guard against someone who might be sick from infecting others and what to do if this occurs.

              The resources, available here, also provide students, school administrators, parents, guardians, or caregivers the information they need to guide their decision-making on attending in-person curriculum and how to adapt to local conditions.

              Source: Updated Resources and Tools for Reopening Schools and Childcare Programs

                Considerations for School-related Public Health Measures in the Context of COVID-19

                In response to COVID-19, countries around the world have implemented several public health and social measures (PHSM), such as movement restrictions, closure of schools and businesses, and international travel restrictions.

                As the local epidemiology of the disease changes, countries will adjust (i.e. loosen or reinstate) these measures according to the intensity of transmission. WHO has issued guidance on adjusting PHSM while managing the risk of resurgence of cases.2 A series of annexes has been developed to help guide countries through adjusting various public health measures in different contexts. This annex provides considerations for decision-makers and educators on how or when to reopen or close schools in the context of COVID-19. These decisions have important implications for children, parents or caregivers, teachers and other staff, communities, and society at large.3 This document was drafted based a review of available literature, discussion with experts, regional partners and country examples.

                Source: Considerations for School-related Public Health Measures in the Context of COVID-19

                  Interim Guidance for Administrators of US K-12 Schools and Child Care Programs to Plan, Prepare, and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

                  This interim guidance is intended for administrators of public and private child care programs and K-12 schools. Administrators are individuals who oversee the daily operations of child care programs and K-12 schools, and may include positions like child care program directors, school district superintendents, principals, and assistant principals.

                  This guidance is intended for administrators at both the school/facility and district level. Why is this guidance being issued? This guidance will help child care programs, schools, and their partners understand how to help prevent the transmission of COVID-19 within child care and school communities and facilities. It also aims to help child care programs, schools, and partners react quickly should a case be identified. The guidance includes considerations to help administrators plan for the continuity of teaching and learning if there is community spread of COVID-19.

                  Source: Interim Guidance for Administrators of US K-12 Schools and Child Care Programs to Plan, Prepare, and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)