COVID-19: Long Term Health Effects

This guidance from Public Health England explains that around 10% of mild coronavirus (COVID-19) cases who were not admitted to a hospital have reported symptoms lasting more than 4 weeks. A number of hospitalized cases reported continuing symptoms for 8 or more weeks following discharge.

It suggests that patients recovering from COVID-19 infection should speak to their family doctor about local care pathways for support and assessment of any long-term symptoms or health problems.

Source: COVID-19: Long Term Health Effects

    COVID-19: Insights on Face Mask Use Global Review

    This report looks at behaviors and perceptions around the use of face masks. It uses the latest available survey responses for each country between May 14th and June 4th, 2020. All responses have been aggregated to offer a global view of key insights related to COVID-19 and face mask use.

    Source: COVID-19: Insights on Face Mask Use Global Review

      The Public’s Role in COVID-19 Vaccination: Planning Recommendations Informed by Design Thinking and the Social, Behavioral, and Communication Sciences

      This report considers human factors in relation to future vaccines against COVID-19, drawing on insights from design thinking and the social, behavioral, and communication sciences. It provides recommendations—directed to both US policymakers and practitioners, as well as nontraditional partners new to public health’s mission of vaccination—on how to advance public understanding of, access to, and acceptance of vaccines that protect against COVID-19.

      The report offers several recommendations for enhancing acceptance of vaccines:

      • Put people at the center of a revolutionary SARS-CoV-2 vaccine research enterprise
      • Understand and inform public expectations about vaccine benefits, risks, and supply
      • Earn the public’s confidence that vaccine allocation and distribution are evenhanded
      • Make vaccination available in safe, familiar, and convenient places
      • Communicate in meaningful, relevant, and personal terms, crowding out misinformation –
      • Establish independent representative bodies (i.e., public oversight committees) to instill public ownership of the vaccination program

      Source: The Public’s Role in COVID-19 Vaccination: Planning Recommendations Informed by Design Thinking and the Social, Behavioral, and Communication Sciences

        Prioritising the Role of Community Health Workers in the COVID-19 Response

        COVID-19 disproportionately affects the poor and vulnerable. Community health workers are poised to play a pivotal role in fighting the pandemic, especially in countries with less resilient health systems.

        Drawing from practitioner expertise across four WHO regions, this article outlines the targeted actions needed at different stages of the pandemic to achieve the following goals:

        1. PROTECT healthcare workers
        2. INTERRUPT the virus
        3. MAINTAIN existing healthcare services while surging their capacity
        4. SHIELD the most vulnerable from socioeconomic shocks.

        While decisive action must be taken now to blunt the impact of the pandemic in countries likely to be hit the hardest, many of the investments in the supply chain, compensation, dedicated supervision, continuous training and performance management necessary for rapid community response in a pandemic are the same as those required to achieve universal healthcare and prevent the next epidemic.

        Source: Prioritising the Role of Community Health Workers in the COVID-19 Response

          Seizing the Moment

          UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic shows that 2020 targets will not be met because of deeply unequal success; COVID-19 risks are blowing HIV progress way off course. Missed targets have resulted in 3.5 million more HIV infections and 820,000 more AIDS-related deaths since 2015 than if the world was on track to meet the 2020 targets. In addition, the response could be set back further, by 10 years or more, if the COVID-19 pandemic results in severe disruptions to HIV services.

          Source: Seizing the Moment

            Early Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Guttmacher Survey of Reproductive Health Experiences

            This report provides an initial look at newly collected data on the emerging impact of the pandemic on women’s sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and reproductive autonomy in the United States.

            It focuses on the following indicators:

            • Childbearing preferences
            • Contraceptive use
            • Access to contraception and other SRH services
            • Telemedicine for contraceptive care
            • Exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV)

            The authors conclude that even in the short period covered by our survey, the COVID-19 pandemic has already had an impact on women’s sexual and reproductive lives. It has affected their ability to obtain needed SRH care and contraceptive services, raised their concerns about affording and accessing this care and shifted their fertility preferences. These effects have not been evenly distributed and tend to be felt by groups bearing the brunt of existing inequities. In this way, the pandemic has illuminated systemic failings that perpetuate health and social disparities.

            Source: Early Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Guttmacher Survey of Reproductive Health Experiences

              COVID-19 Exposes the Harsh Realities of Gender Inequality in Slums

              The COVID-19 pandemic is largely concentrated in cities and urban areas, with around 2,600 cities globally reporting at least one case of the disease. While the epicentre of the global health crisis is still Europe and North America, its impact on developing countries may be more devastating, especially for the poorest. The 1 billion+ people living in slums and slum-like settings in developing countries, where population density is high, are those most at-risk and least prepared.

              Most countries have responded with shelter-in-place orders, lockdowns and measures to curtail COVID-19’s spread. But slum-dwellers will have a hard time complying, as their overcrowded housing often lacks basic utilities, like water and sanitation. For women and girls who are slum-dwellers, the challenges are even greater as they face increased domestic violence (already being reported) and unpaid care burdens.

              Women aged 15 to 49 are overrepresented in urban slums and slum-like settings in 80 per cent of the 59 developing countries analysed in a Spotlight on Goal 11 paper, produced by UN Women and UN-Habitat. In Kibera, Kenya, the world’s fourth-most-populated slum – and where COVID-19 cases are highest in East Africa – there are 116 women for every 100 men. The figure is 120+ women per 100 men in Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti and Lesotho. In 61 per cent of the 59 developing countries analysed, more than half of women aged 15–49 live in slums.

              Source: COVID-19 Exposes the Harsh Realities of Gender Inequality in Slums

                Atelier d’évaluation et de ré-planification du plan d’action opérationnel intégré de la communication de risque 2020

                Ce document a été produit pour la coordination des activités des partenaires qui appuie la plateforme One Health dans le cadre de la communication de risque.

                Source: Atelier d’évaluation et de ré-planification du plan d’action opérationnel intégré de la communication de risque 2020

                  Physical Distancing, Face Masks, and Eye Protection for Prevention of COVID-19

                  Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19 and is spread personto-person through close contact.

                  The authors of this article aimed to investigate the effects of physical distance, face masks, and eye protection on virus transmission in health-care and non-health-care (eg, community) settings. They did a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the optimum distance for avoiding person-toperson virus transmission and to assess the use of face masks and eye protection to prevent transmission of viruses.

                  The findings of this systematic review and meta-analysis support physical distancing of 1 m or more and provide quantitative estimates for models and contact tracing to inform policy. Optimum use of face masks, respirators, and eye protection in public and health-care settings should be informed by these findings and contextual factors. Robust randomised trials are needed to better inform the evidence for these interventions, but this systematic appraisal of currently best available evidence might inform interim guidance.

                  Source: Physical Distancing, Face Masks, and Eye Protection for Prevention of COVID-19

                    Building Trust while Influencing Online COVID-19 Content in the Social Media World

                    Because of COVID-19’s strict physical distancing measures, people are heavily reliant on maintaining connectivity using global digital social networks, such as Facebook or Twitter, to facilitate human interaction and information sharing about the virus.

                    In this article, the authors discuss some ways in which social media has undermined effective responses to COVID-19. They consider how various groups could respond to these challenges—especially government leaders, social media companies, and healthcare providers. Ultimately, these actors each have roles to play in preventing social media from being weaponised to sow distrust and further endanger public health, while also ensuring that social media can fulfill its essential civic function of facilitating good faith political expression and discourse.

                    Source: Building Trust while Influencing Online COVID-19 Content in the Social Media World