COVID-19-Related Misinformation on Social Media: A Systematic Review

This review focuses on misinformation that appeared early in the pandemic. During this phase, little was known about the virus, such as how it spread or how infected people could be treated most effectively.

Source: COVID-19-Related Misinformation on Social Media: A Systematic Review

    The Role of The Communication Discipline to Tackle COVID-19: Interrogating Positive Deviances and Critical Discourses

    As we deal with the complexities of this global health calamity and prepare for a post-COVID-19 world order, we believe that the discipline of communication is making, and will make, an invaluable contribution. In this spirit, as editors of this special issue of Journal of Creative Communications devoted to COVID-19, we are delighted to present this disciplinary offering that is rich in scope, international in nature, and theoretically and conceptually insightful in its tapestry.

    Source: The Role of The Communication Discipline to Tackle COVID-19: Interrogating Positive Deviances and Critical Discourses

      Behavioral Change Can Reduce Transmission

      This article outlines seven steps on how to encourage behavioral change that would reduce transmission of COVID-19. Some of the steps include: creating a positive social norm around mask wearing, communicating the benefits of mask wearing, needing responsible media, compassionate leadership, etc.

      Source: Behavioral Change Can Reduce Transmission

        Real-Time Tracking of COVID-19 Rumors Using Community-Based Methods in Côte d’Ivoire

        Breakthrough ACTION developed a process and technology for systematically collecting, analyzing, and addressing COVID-19 rumors in real-time in Côte d’Ivoire. Rumors were submitted through community-based contributors and collected from callers to the national hotlines and then processed on a cloud-hosted database.

        Source: Real-Time Tracking of COVID-19 Rumors Using Community-Based Methods in Côte d’Ivoire

          Nudges, vaccination psychology and messaging

          The Washington Post conducted research which showed that using various text messages increased vaccine uptake. The same strategy could be used by state health departments to encourage teenagers and adults to schedule an appointment for the COVID-19 vaccine.

          Source: Nudges, vaccination psychology and messaging

            What Does it Mean to Engage the Public in the Response to COVID-19?

            The authors of this article examine the different types of demands found in calls for public engagement in pandemic decision making and explain how to meet them. They focus on the responsibilities of governments because their decisions have far reaching social consequences, but institutions such as hospital systems, schools, corporations, and universities also make decisions that profoundly affect the communities they serve and should engage affected communities in their decision making.

            Source: What Does it Mean to Engage the Public in the Response to COVID-19?

              So You are Vaccinated. How Can you Let People Know?

              This Wired article explains several ways we can let people know that we have been vaccinated against COVID-19. Some ways include: stickers or buttons, avoiding slogans that are scolding or aggressive, and slowly begin to relax masking for fully vaccinated individuals.

              Source: So You are Vaccinated. How Can you Let People Know?

                Infodemics and Infodemiology: A Short History, a Long Future

                This paper describes the characteristics of an infodemic, which combines an inordinately high volume of information (leading to problems relating to locating the information, storage capacity, ensuring quality, visibility and validity) and rapid output (making it hard to assess its value, manage the gatekeeping process, apply results, track its history, and leading to a waste of effort).

                This is bound up with the collateral growth of misinformation, disinformation and malinformation. Solutions to the problems posed by an infodemic will be sought in improved technology and changed social and regulatory frameworks.

                One solution could be a new trusted top-level domain for health information. The World Health Organization has so far made two unsuccessful attempts to create such a domain, but it is suggested this could be attempted again, in the light of the COVID-19 infodemic experience. The vital role of reliable information in public health should also be explicitly recognized in the Sustainable Development Goals, with explicit targets. All countries should develop knowledge preparedness plans for future emergencies.

                Source: Infodemics and Infodemiology: A Short History, a Long Future

                  RCCE Guide for Community Health Workers, Volunteers, and Social Mobilizers

                  This Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) Guide serves as a guide for community health workers (CHWs), volunteers, and social mobilizers in communicating with people on COVID-19 and helping them protect themselves and others from the virus. This guide contains importance of community engagement during health crisis, how to talk to people in the community, how to protect yourself and others while on duty, and key messages that need to be conveyed to the community and to specific audience groups.

                  Using the guide, Department of Health, in partnership with USAID Breakthrough ACTION, UNICEF, and WHO conducted RCCE online trainings via Zoom to CHWs, volunteers, and social mobilizers.

                  Sources:

                    Vaccine Messaging Guide

                    This Guide was developed by the Yale Institute of Global Health and the UNICEF Demand for Immunization team. It is intended for public health professionals, communicators, advocates and anyone else who wishes to create pro-vaccine content to motivate people to vaccinate themselves and their entourage.

                    An increasing body of formative research has identified a complex mix of determinants of people’s vaccine decisions, however there remains a paucity of implementation research that has applied these insights to the design and testing of messaging interventions.

                    Every recommendation herein is based on the current evidence, but the authors encourage users to test all content for behavior-related outcomes.

                    Source: Vaccine Messaging Guide