Ajustement à bases factuelles des mesures de santé publique et des mesures sociales

Un rapport de lignes directrices provisoires pour les États membres de la région africaine de l’OMS concernant la santé publique et les mesures sociales pour prévenir la propagation des COVID-19.

Source: Ajustement à bases factuelles des mesures de santé publique et des mesures sociales

    Seizing the Moment

    UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic shows that 2020 targets will not be met because of deeply unequal success; COVID-19 risks are blowing HIV progress way off course. Missed targets have resulted in 3.5 million more HIV infections and 820,000 more AIDS-related deaths since 2015 than if the world was on track to meet the 2020 targets. In addition, the response could be set back further, by 10 years or more, if the COVID-19 pandemic results in severe disruptions to HIV services.

    Source: Seizing the Moment

      COVID-19 Planning Guide for Adapting Risk Communication and Community Engagement as Public Health and Social Measures Shift: With Safety Tips for Conducting Community Meetings

      This document includes key Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) considerations during shifting lockdown measures, safety measures for conducting in-person community meetings, and a template that brings both of these considerations together to help agencies adapt their RCCE approaches as these measures shift.

      Appendices include key RCCE considerations for different community and humanitarian contexts, and free downloadable images and a flyer that can be used to promote safe community meetings.

      All are invited to share either the live version or download a PDF version.

      Source: COVID-19 Planning Guide for Adapting Risk Communication and Community Engagement as Public Health and Social Measures Shift: With Safety Tips for Conducting Community Meetings

        Early Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Guttmacher Survey of Reproductive Health Experiences

        This report provides an initial look at newly collected data on the emerging impact of the pandemic on women’s sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and reproductive autonomy in the United States.

        It focuses on the following indicators:

        • Childbearing preferences
        • Contraceptive use
        • Access to contraception and other SRH services
        • Telemedicine for contraceptive care
        • Exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV)

        The authors conclude that even in the short period covered by our survey, the COVID-19 pandemic has already had an impact on women’s sexual and reproductive lives. It has affected their ability to obtain needed SRH care and contraceptive services, raised their concerns about affording and accessing this care and shifted their fertility preferences. These effects have not been evenly distributed and tend to be felt by groups bearing the brunt of existing inequities. In this way, the pandemic has illuminated systemic failings that perpetuate health and social disparities.

        Source: Early Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Guttmacher Survey of Reproductive Health Experiences

          Cambodia’s 115 Hotline: Successful COVID-19 Digital Response

          An existing hotline in Cambodia has been scaled up for COVID-19 Digital Response, going from 500-600 calls per day to 18,000 calls on peak days. Roughly 75% of callers access the health education menu and 25% are reporting suspect COVID-19 cases/symptoms.

          Cambodia CDC is using the hotline as a primary first point of contact for all potential COVID-19 cases in the country – surveillance officers have staffed up to answer calls around the clock, screen callers, and direct them to appropriate rapid response teams/contract tracing teams for verification and testing.

          As testing is still very limited, this approach is helping them reduce the overall burden on the health system – trying to give people the education and screening they need remotely.

          Expanding the 115 Hotline has allowed the Cambodian government to efficiently and effectively implement a response to the outbreak in their country.  The ability to respond quickly, and reduce the burden of wasting critical time looking for or developing new solutions is just one of many.

          This article lists several reasons for the success of the hotline.

          Source: Cambodia’s 115 Hotline: Successful COVID-19 Digital Response

            More Than 117 Million Children at Risk of Missing Out on Measles Vaccines, as COVID-19 Surges

            WHO has reported that as COVID-19 continues to spread globally, over 117 million children in 37 countries may miss out on receiving life-saving measles vaccine. Measles immunization campaigns in 24 countries have already been delayed; more will be postponed.

            Source: More Than 117 Million Children at Risk of Missing Out on Measles Vaccines, as COVID-19 Surges

              Reaching Communities in Chad with COVID-19 Safety Messages

              This case study relates how communities in Chad are carrying out SBC for COVID-19, especially considering the crowded conditions in which much of the population lives. By using community members, the messaging has gotten out.

              Village chiefs, neighbourhood leaders and health workers have volunteered to be part of Chad’s door-to-door campaigns to sensitize the public. They are mostly members of the communities they are reaching out to.  In a country where most people live communally, it is a challenge to enforce physical distancing.

              Source: Reaching Communities in Chad with COVID-19 Safety Messages

                YouTube as a Source of Patient Information for Coronavirus Disease (COVID ‐19): A Content‐Quality and Audience Engagement Analysis

                YouTube is the second most popular website in the world and is increasingly being used as a platform for disseminating health information. The authors’ aim was to evaluate the content‐quality and audience engagement of YouTube videos pertaining to the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)‐CoV‐2 virus which causes the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID‐19), during the early phase of the pandemic.

                They chose the first 30 videos for seven different search phrases: “2019 nCoV,” “SARS CoV‐2,” “COVID‐19 virus,” “coronavirus treatment,” “coronavirus explained,” “what is the coronavirus” and “coronavirus information.” Video contents were evaluated by two independent medical students with more than 5 years of experience using the DISCERN instrument. Qualitative data, quantitative data and upload source for each video was noted for a quality and audience engagement analysis.

                Out of the total 210 videos, 137 were evaluated. The mean DISCERN score was 31.33 out of 75 possible points, which indicates that the quality of YouTube videos on COVID‐19 is currently poor. There was excellent reliability between the two raters (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.96). 55% of the videos discussed prevention, 49% discussed symptoms and 46% discussed the spread of the virus.

                Most of the videos were uploaded by news channels (50%) and education channels (40%). The quality of YouTube videos on SARS‐CoV‐2 and COVID‐19 is poor, however, the authors have listed the top‐quality videos in their article as they may be effective tools for patient education during the pandemic.

                Source: YouTube as a Source of Patient Information for Coronavirus Disease (COVID ‐19): A Content‐Quality and Audience Engagement Analysis

                  How Might We Use Communication to Encourage Physical Distancing in Developing Countries

                  As countries around the world wrestle with the issue of how best to contain the virus, physical distancing (or social distancing, as it is often referred to) has emerged as one of the leading public health recommendations for limiting infection rates. Developed and developing countries alike are adopting this as a policy, as seen through a succession of state- and country-wide ‘lockdowns’ and ban on mass gatherings.

                  Physical distancing is essential in areas where public health systems are weaker and access to healthcare is more limited. And yet, population density in informal settlements, low literacy levels and poor WASH facilities mean that it is in precisely these areas that physical distancing is hard to achieve.

                  This guide is the product of a one-hour virtual working session, hosted by The Curve and attended by leading practitioners, donors and civil servants working in developing countries across the world. It outlines 9 pragmatic ways in which public health communications might promote both the understanding of, and adherence to, physical distancing measures in developing countries.

                  This document is not intended to be an exhaustive study or a complete answer to the question. Rather, it is a contribution to a vibrant sector-wide discussion including publications and perspectives by the Hygiene Hub and many others. The recommendations are a set of pragmatic advice based on the contributors’ experience that is intended to complement and invigorate the broader conversation.

                  Source: How Might We Use Communication to Encourage Physical Distancing in Developing Countries

                    Stigma During the COVID-19 Pandemic

                    Stigma associated with COVID-19 poses a serious threat to the lives of healthcare workers, patients, and survivors of the disease.

                    In May 2020, a community of advocates comprising of 13 medical and humanitarian organisations including, among others, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the the International Hospital Federation, and World Medical Association issued a declaration that condemned more than 200 incidents of COVID-19 related attacks on healthcare workers and health facilities during the ongoing pandemic.

                    Source: Stigma During the COVID-19 Pandemic