Coronavirus: The Seven Types of People who Start and Spread Viral Misinformation

BBC Media have investigated hundreds of misleading stories during the pandemic. It’s given them an idea about who is behind misinformation – and what motivates them.

According to BBC Media, gere are seven types of people who start and spread falsehoods:

  1. The joker
  2. The scammer
  3. The politician
  4. The conspiracy theorist
  5. The insider
  6. The relative
  7. The celebrity

Source: Coronavirus: The Seven Types of People who Start and Spread Viral Misinformation

    Coronavirus: Here’s How You can Stop Bad Information from Going Viral

    A UK parliamentary sub-committee is asking members of the public to submit examples. The committee has particularly requested submissions of disinformation spread in private groups and closed apps such as WhatsApp. Meanwhile, experts are calling on the public to practice “information hygiene”.

    Here are the ways in which the article states one can stop bad information from going viral:

    1. Stop and think
    2. Check your source
    3. Could it be a fake?
    4. Unsure whether it’s true? Don’t share
    5. Check each fact, individually
    6. Beware emotional posts
    7. Think about biases

    Source: Coronavirus: Here’s How You can Stop Bad Information from Going Viral

    Using Media and Communication to Respond to Public Health Emergencies: Lessons Learned from Ebola (BBC Media)

    This practice briefing sets out what BBC Media Action learned in delivering and supporting health communication in response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa in 2014–15. It has a particular focus on Sierra Leone as this was the hub of the organization’s response.

    Source: Using Media and Communication to Respond to Public Health Emergencies: Lessons Learned from Ebola

    Guide to Community Engagement at a Distance

    This short guide is designed to assist development and humanitarian agencies to think through how risk communication and community engagement activity related to COVID-19 can be carried out without face-to-face interaction with communities.

    By using remote methods, agencies will be able to safeguard the health of their own and their partners’ staff and volunteers, while still ensuring that communities receive accurate, up-to-date information as well as having access to communication channels which allow them to provide feedback and share their concerns and worries.

    Source: Guide to Community Engagement at a Distance