Home-Based Care Reference Guide for COVID-19

This guide provides recommendations to nonprofits, Red Cross Red Crescent network and community organizations who are designing programs and materials in response to COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries.

The working group designed it as a supplemental tool for organizations working specifically with community health workers (CHWs) (including trained community health volunteers) as they are reaching households, however the content can be adapted for other purposes.

This guide focuses on three main areas: how to support a person whose condition warrants home care because of non-severe symptoms and home care is recommended by local jurisdictions; how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the home; and how to provide emotional support to family members. While this manual provides information on danger signs of COVID-19, it should not be used as a guide for when and how a person who has COVID-19 (or its symptoms) should seek medical care. All content adapted to different countries should reflect local policy guidelines and recommendations.

Source: Home-Based Care Reference Guide for COVID-19

    Seizing the Moment

    UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic shows that 2020 targets will not be met because of deeply unequal success; COVID-19 risks are blowing HIV progress way off course. Missed targets have resulted in 3.5 million more HIV infections and 820,000 more AIDS-related deaths since 2015 than if the world was on track to meet the 2020 targets. In addition, the response could be set back further, by 10 years or more, if the COVID-19 pandemic results in severe disruptions to HIV services.

    Source: Seizing the Moment

      Fake News Can Be Deadly. Here’s How To Spot It

      This blog was designed as a comic strip, and explains how to detect misinformation about COVID-19.

      Source: Fake News Can Be Deadly. Here’s How To Spot It

        Coronavirus: The Human Cost of Virus Misinformation

        A BBC team tracking coronavirus misinformation has found links to assaults, arsons and deaths. And experts say the potential for indirect harm caused by rumours, conspiracy theories and bad health information could be much bigger.

        Source: Coronavirus: The Human Cost of Virus Misinformation

          How to Fight an Infodemic: The Four Pillars of Infodemic Management

          The World Health Organization (WHO) is presenting a framework for managing the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infodemic. Infodemiology is now acknowledged by public health organizations and the WHO as an important emerging scientific field and critical area of practice during a pandemic.

          From the perspective of being the first “infodemiolgist” who originally coined the term almost two decades ago, the author posts four pillars of infodemic management:

          • Information monitoring (infoveillance)
          • Building eHealth Literacy and science literacy capacity
          • Encouraging knowledge refinement and quality improvement processes such as fact checking and peer-review
          • Accurate and timely knowledge translation, minimizing distorting factors such as political or commercial influences

          Source: How to Fight an Infodemic: The Four Pillars of Infodemic Management

            Framework for Managing the COVID-19 Infodemic: Methods and Results of an Online, Crowdsourced WHO Technical Consultation

            A World Health Organization (WHO) technical consultation on responding to the infodemic related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic was held, entirely online, to crowdsource suggested actions for a framework for infodemic management.

            The first version of this framework proposes five action areas in which WHO Member States and actors within society can apply, according to their mandate, an infodemic management approach adapted to national contexts and practices. Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and the related infodemic require swift, regular, systematic, and coordinated action from multiple sectors of society and government. It remains crucial that we promote trusted information and fight misinformation, thereby helping save lives.

            Source: Framework for Managing the COVID-19 Infodemic: Methods and Results of an Online, Crowdsourced WHO Technical Consultation

              COVID-19 Planning Guide for Adapting Risk Communication and Community Engagement as Public Health and Social Measures Shift: With Safety Tips for Conducting Community Meetings

              This document includes key Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) considerations during shifting lockdown measures, safety measures for conducting in-person community meetings, and a template that brings both of these considerations together to help agencies adapt their RCCE approaches as these measures shift.

              Appendices include key RCCE considerations for different community and humanitarian contexts, and free downloadable images and a flyer that can be used to promote safe community meetings.

              All are invited to share either the live version or download a PDF version.

              Source: COVID-19 Planning Guide for Adapting Risk Communication and Community Engagement as Public Health and Social Measures Shift: With Safety Tips for Conducting Community Meetings

                Nine Tips for Spotting Misinformation about the Coronavirus

                This article lists nine tips for staying calm and informed when hearing information about coronavirus.

                The nine tips are:

                1. Does the story play on your emotions or present facts using neutral language?
                2. Is it too good to be true?
                3. What is the date of the story?
                4. Who is the author?
                5. Does the information come from a credible source?
                6. Does the story use or abuse data?
                7. Does it show causation or correlation?
                8. Does the story talk about cost and availability?
                9. Of mice or men?

                Source: Nine Tips for Spotting Misinformation about the Coronavirus

                  Early Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Guttmacher Survey of Reproductive Health Experiences

                  This report provides an initial look at newly collected data on the emerging impact of the pandemic on women’s sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and reproductive autonomy in the United States.

                  It focuses on the following indicators:

                  • Childbearing preferences
                  • Contraceptive use
                  • Access to contraception and other SRH services
                  • Telemedicine for contraceptive care
                  • Exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV)

                  The authors conclude that even in the short period covered by our survey, the COVID-19 pandemic has already had an impact on women’s sexual and reproductive lives. It has affected their ability to obtain needed SRH care and contraceptive services, raised their concerns about affording and accessing this care and shifted their fertility preferences. These effects have not been evenly distributed and tend to be felt by groups bearing the brunt of existing inequities. In this way, the pandemic has illuminated systemic failings that perpetuate health and social disparities.

                  Source: Early Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Guttmacher Survey of Reproductive Health Experiences

                    How Behavioral Science Can Help Contain the Coronavirus

                    Very little is known about how factors like fear, misinformation, stress, and social norms are shaping behaviors that affect transmission of COVID-19. Even less is understood about what might lead people to ignore government recommendations altogether.

                    To fill in these gaps, a consortium of more than 100 behavioral researchers on five continents is currently working around the clock to measure the full social and material consequences of this pandemic. Our goal is simple: to demonstrate in real time what is working—and what isn’t.

                    The study is designed in three phases. The first consists of a 20-minute-long survey taken weekly that gauges how human beings are coping during this unprecedented crisis. Questions focus on individual thoughts, feelings, concerns and motivations, and how COVID-19 affects everything from faith in leaders to attitudes toward migrants. More than 45,000 people in 100 countries have taken the survey in 22 languages, and the study leaders are registering additional respondents every day.

                    Source: How Behavioral Science Can Help Contain the Coronavirus