The CDC Says Tight-Fit Masks or Double Masking Increases Protection

New research by the agency shows that transmission of the virus can be reduced by up to 96.5 percent if both an infected individual and an uninfected individual wear tightly fitted surgical masks or a cloth-and-surgical-mask combination.

One option for reducing transmission is to wear a cloth mask over a surgical mask, the agency said. The alternative is to fit the surgical mask more tightly on the face by “knotting and tucking” — that is, knotting the two strands of the ear loops together where they attach to the edge of the mask, then folding and flattening the extra fabric at the mask’s edge and tucking it in for a tighter seal.

Other effective options that improve the fit include using a mask-fitter — a frame contoured to the face — over a mask, or wearing a sleeve of sheer nylon hosiery material around the neck and pulled up over a cloth or surgical mask, the C.D.C. said.

Source: The CDC Says Tight-Fit Masks or Double Masking Increases Protection

    YouTube as a Source of Information on the COVID-19 Pandemic

    This paper seeks to assess the quality and validity of information available on YouTube, based on the current Center for Disease Control (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines.

    The authors identified the 250 most-viewed videos from 1 January 2020 to 12 May 2020 on YouTube using keyword ‘COVID 19’. Two independent reviewers analyzed the English-language videos as useful, misleading, or news updates.

    After excluding non-English and irrelevant videos, 100 videos were analyzed. The conclusion in the article is that YouTube is an increasingly important source of medical information during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most of the videos were useful, however due to the public nature of the platform, misleading information may also be easily disseminated. Independent users are more likely to post-misleading videos.

    Source: YouTube as a Source of Information on the COVID-19 Pandemic

      Critical Observations on and Suggested Ways Forward for Healthcare Communication during COVID-19: pEACH Position Paper

      This is a position paper that presents observations relating to policy and practice in communication in healthcare related to COVID-19. The authors state that communication in healthcare and COVID-19 have a mutually influential relationship that is informed by policy and has influenced practice. The fast pace at which policies have been developed for and practice has adapted to COVID-19 necessitates critical reflection.

      Evidence-based guidance for communication in healthcare in COVID-19 is central to shaping approaches to public health communication. Evidence-based guidance is also necessary for the challenges faced in communicating with patients, their families, and carers during COVID-19.

      This paper provides a summary of the key areas for development in communication in healthcare during COVID-19. It offers recommendations for improvement and a call to review policies and practice to build resilience and inclusive and equitable responsiveness in communication in healthcare.

      Source: Critical Observations on and Suggested Ways Forward for Healthcare Communication during COVID-19: pEACH Position Paper

        Fake Covid Videos ‘Will Cost Lives’

        The Royal College of Physicians is urging people not to share and “copycat” “dangerous” videos claiming steam inhalation can prevent Covid-19. The BBC has found that alternative coronavirus treatments are being sent on chat apps like WhatsApp, as well as being widely available on social media.

        BBC reporter Sima Kotecha has tracked the origins of one of these false videos to the state of Gujarat in India.

        Source: Fake Covid Videos ‘Will Cost Lives’

          A Guide to Vaccinations for COVID-19

          The guide explains how vaccines work and answers your common questions as well as providing up-to-date information on the current approved COVID-19 vaccinations in the UK.

          Source: A Guide to Vaccinations for COVID-19

            COVID-19 Global Risk Communication and Community Engagement Strategy

            The shift presented in this strategy is to move from the directive, one-way communication, which characterized the early stages of the COVID-19 response, towards the community engagement and participatory approaches that have been proven to help control and eliminate outbreaks in the past.

            Source: COVID-19 Global Risk Communication and Community Engagement Strategy

              Vaccine Myths vs Science

              This three minute and forty-four second video, part of WHO’s Science in 5 video series, features WHO’s Dr Katherine O’Brien busts some vaccine myths related to infertility, DNA and composition of vaccines.

              Source: Vaccine Myths vs Science

                Guidance on Developing a National Deployment and Vaccination Plan for COVID-19 Vaccines

                This book, and its accompanying orientation course is intended to support national and sub-national focal points in preparing for COVID-19 vaccination. It provides an overview of key aspects of the guidance on developing a national deployment and vaccination plan for COVID-19 vaccines and highlights available and upcoming resources for COVID-19 vaccine introduction.

                Source: Guidance on Developing a National Deployment and Vaccination Plan for COVID-19 Vaccines

                  The Vaccination Demand Hub

                  The Vaccination Demand Hub is a network of partner organizations innovating together to understand why people miss out, to improve acceptance and uptake of vaccines, and to ensure that everyone everywhere is protected against vaccine preventable diseases.

                  Source: The Vaccination Demand Hub

                    Vaccine Misinformation Field Guide

                    This resource was created by the UNICEF Programme Division, Health Section, Immunization Unit C4D team, in collaboration with The Public Good Projects, First Draft and Yale Institute of Global Health.

                    Source: Vaccine Misinformation Field Guide