KAP COVID Dashboard: Global Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices around COVID-19

This dashboard is a visualization of a study of knowledge, attitudes and practices around COVID-19 and is a collaboration among Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, Facebook Data for Good, MIT, WHO and Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network.

View the dashboard. 

COVID-19, Maternal and Child Health, Nutrition – What Does the Science Tell Us?

This resource tool is compiled by the Johns Hopkins Center for Humanitarian Health and provides an overview of what peer-reviewed journal articles currently state on COVID-19, maternal and child health (including infants), and nutrition.

As the pandemic is ongoing more and more research results are published.

Source: COVID-19, Maternal and Child Health, Nutrition – What Does the Science Tell Us?

    Vaccine Confidence: A Global Analysis Exploring Volatility, Polarization, and Trust

    This study reports that there is growing evidence of vaccine delays or refusals due to a lack of trust in the importance, safety, or effectiveness of vaccines, alongside persisting access issues. Although immunization coverage is reported administratively across the world, no similarly robust monitoring system exists for vaccine confidence. In this study, vaccine confidence was mapped across 149 countries between 2015 and 2019.

    The study’s findings highlight the importance of regular monitoring to detect emerging trends to prompt interventions to build and sustain vaccine confidence.

    Source: Vaccine Confidence: A Global Analysis Exploring Volatility, Polarization, and Trust

      Gearing Up for Effective COVID-19 Vaccine Communication

      This article offers tips to prepare for effective COVID-19 vaccine communication.

      The tips are:

      • Resist the urge to overpromise.
      • Be honest about what we don’t know.
      • Stick to solid ground.
      • Build trust in the process.
      • Go back to basics.

      Source: Gearing Up for Effective COVID-19 Vaccine Communication

        Coronavirus: Why are Women Paying a Heavier Price?

        Women have shown better COVID-19 outcomes than men – in part thanks to an additional X chromosome and sex hormones like oestrogen, which provoke better immune responses to the virus that causes COVID-19. But any such advantage is reversed when it comes to the social and economic effects of the pandemic; here the brunt falls heaviest on women.

        What has disproportionately affected women is insecurity and loss of employment because women tend to work in informal sectors with no financial protection or benefits. Data gathered by UN Women shows that of all healthcare workers infected with COVID-19 in Spain and Italy, 72 percent and 66 percent respectively were women.

        Source: Coronavirus: Why are Women Paying a Heavier Price?

          Three Lessons from the Global South on Combating the Pandemic

          This article, by Dr Muhammad Musa of BRAC International, a Bangladesh-based NGO, states that top-down measures to curb the spread of the virus – dramatic steps like lockdowns and bans on large gatherings – pose an immediate threat to families in the poorest communities.

          He writes that the key to fixing this situation is community engagement and the involvement of local leaders.

          Source: Three Lessons from the Global South on Combating the Pandemic

            What is the World Doing about COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance?

            Even before the COVID-19 crisis, the WHO declared vaccination hesitancy one of the Top 10 threats to global health in 2019.

            A vaccine will help prevent new infections, and more than that, it will help businesses and schools in hard-hit countries get back to normal. Vast amounts of money have been invested in finding a vaccine and media reports update us regularly on the progress of over 200 candidate vaccines under evaluation.This blog shares research on vaccine acceptance worldwide.

            Source: What is the World Doing about COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance?

              COVID-19 Contact Tracing Online Course

              The COVID-19 crisis has created an unprecedented need for contact tracing across the country, requiring thousands of people to learn key skills quickly. The job qualifications for contact tracing positions differ throughout the country and the world, with some new positions open to individuals with a high school diploma or equivalent.

              In this introductory course, students will learn about the science of SARS-CoV-2 , including the infectious period, the clinical presentation of COVID-19, and the evidence for how SARS-CoV-2 is transmitted from person-to-person and why contact tracing can be such an effective public health intervention. Students will learn about how contact tracing is done, including how to build rapport with cases, identify their contacts, and support both cases and their contacts to stop transmission in their communities.

              The course will also cover several important ethical considerations around contact tracing, isolation, and quarantine. Finally, the course will identify some of the most common barriers to contact tracing efforts — along with strategies to overcome them.

              Source: COVID-19 Contact Tracing Online Course

                COVID-19 Health Literacy Project

                This project creates and translates accessible COVID-19 information into different languages to help all patients know when, and how, to seek care. The materials are created in collaboration with Harvard Health Publishing.

                All of the materials are reviewed and vetted by physicians and medical school faculty members at the Harvard hospitals. These materials are created in collaboration with Harvard Health Publishing. The materials are freely available for download and distribution without copyright restrictions. The project currently supports 35 languages.

                Source: COVID-19 Health Literacy Project

                  COVID-19–Related Infodemic and Its Impact on Public Health: A Global Social Media Analysis

                  The authors of this article followed and examined COVID-19–related rumors, stigma, and conspiracy theories circulating on online platforms, including fact-checking agency websites, Facebook, Twitter, and online newspapers, and their impacts on public health.

                  Information was extracted between December 31, 2019 and April 5, 2020, and descriptively analyzed. They performed a content analysis of the news articles to compare and contrast data collected from other sources, and identified 2,311 reports of rumors, stigma, and conspiracy theories in 25 languages from 87 countries. Claims were related to illness, transmission and mortality (24%), control measures (21%), treatment and cure (19%), cause of disease including the origin (15%), violence (1%), and miscellaneous (20%).

                  Of the 2,276 reports for which text ratings were available, 1,856 claims were false (82%).

                  Misinformation fueled by rumors, stigma, and conspiracy theories can have potentially serious implications on the individual and community if prioritized over evidence-based guidelines. Health agencies must track misinformation associated with the COVID-19 in real time, and engage local communities and government stakeholders to debunk misinformation.

                  Source: COVID-19–Related Infodemic and Its Impact on Public Health: A Global Social Media Analysis